WHAT THE HELL AM I DOING HERE I DON'T BELONG HERE WHOOOAAA WHOOOOAAA SHEEEEE'S RUNNNING OUT THE DOOOOOR SHEEEEE'S RUNNING OUT SHE RUNS RUNS RUNNNS RUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUNNS


Text

Feb 26, 2014
@ 12:52 am
Permalink
1 note

Anonymous said: Sweet wrongblr bro. Try citing sources if you want people to take you seriously. You seem like a really misguided dude who is desperate to be taken seriously. I cringe at all your posts because of the desperation.

musclebrain101fitness:

nope. i study hard core FACTs not FADS maybe you should get some real training and knowledge before you judge others for spreading hardcore facts. you gonna sit there and tell me that anatomy & physiology, exercise physiology, biochemistry, molecular & cell biology, neuroscience and psychology and all the other courses ive taken and books ive read are ALL wrong? sorry but NO. i read and reread and cross reference and researched. 

im so far from desperation because im not the one sending anon posts and talking shit and trying to put someone down whos worked hard to learn all he can to be the best at what he does. so the only one here thats in desperation is YOU. 

now go get a life and go read a ral book and learn some real shit. even kids know better than to cut carbs, an essential nutrient from their diet.

hey man it’s gonna be ok


Link

Feb 25, 2014
@ 9:30 pm
Permalink
29 notes

Carbohydrate-Restricted Diets »

redwhiteandjacked:

kettlebellfit2013:

Fad diets almost always severely cut carbohydrate foods from their lists of recommended consumption. Not only does this sap your energy, it can also harm athletic performance. The fact is, you need carbohydrates for your brain, heart, and muscles, among other vital organs. The main fuel of the…

OH MY GOD GUYS HE’S A I.S.S.A. CPT!!!

WE WERE WRONG, HIS OUTDATED BULLSHIT TRAINING BOOK SAID SO!!

IN A DESPERATE ATTEMPT TO VALIDATE HIMSELF HE ALSO FINDS IT PERTINENT TO MENTION HE’S CPR/AED CERTIFIED BECAUSE THE MORE LETTERS YOU CAN PUT DOWN THE MORE CREDIBLE YOU ARE

FITNESS IMAGE CRAFTING AT ITS FINEST

(Source: musclebrain101fitness)


Link

Feb 25, 2014
@ 9:25 pm
Permalink
29 notes

Carbohydrate-Restricted Diets »

kettlebellfit2013:

Fad diets almost always severely cut carbohydrate foods from their lists of recommended consumption. Not only does this sap your energy, it can also harm athletic performance. The fact is, you need carbohydrates for your brain, heart, and muscles, among other vital organs. The main fuel of the…

real talk citing your fake personal training manual discredits you

god bless


Link

Jan 13, 2014
@ 6:38 pm
Permalink
34 notes

Offering a civil place of discussion »

zombearsquatter:

frontraisesforever:

zombearsquatter:

frontraisesforever:

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

zombearsquatter:

In all the drama going on, I’d like to offer an oasis. I have competed in a push/pull meet and am prepping for my first full meet on March 1. I am, technically, a competitive powerlifter. There is a difference between competitive and recreational powerlifting/bodybuilding/Olympic weightlifting….

I don’t think it’s divisive to the community to use correct terminology. Non-competitors aren’t oppressed, they’re just not called competitors. In fact, non-competitors are often welcomed and ENCOURAGED to enter contests to further themselves and their lifting.

If it’s about the sport, it doesn’t grow unless people actively participate in it, “respect” for the sport improves when non-competitors participate and understand it more intimately than they would by logging their workouts on fitocracy or something. 

There shouldn’t be any negative connotations between being called something or not (and if we’re going to be real I personally attach a negative connotation to BEING a powerlifter) to me it’s just calling a spade a spade. 

Competitors are called “competitors”.

I knew just as much about an arched bench and squatting to parallel before I competed.

People who don’t know these things don’t not know them because they haven’t competed. They don’t know them because they haven’t made use of the internet.

If I hadn’t already, all this talk would turn me off competing or wanting to be a powerlifter. It just looks like people are jerks. In reality, that’s not the case. By telling people they’re not a powerlifter or bodybuilder or whatever else, you are excluding them.

Competing doesn’t grant you a badge and all the knowledge of universe.

People who don’t know shit shouldn’t try to teach others, agreed. People can know shit without having competed.

If you feel excluded because there are some people in a certain community who don’t want to address you with a certain term until you’ve participated in an integral activity to that community, that is you either attaching too much significance to the term or too much importance to how others define you. I’m not saying people “shouldn’t” call themselves powerlifters unless they’ve participated in a meet, I’m just saying it’s factually wrong.

If I started going to an mma gym a few times a week for fun but never intended on signing up for a fight, I wouldn’t call myself an mma fighter. If I were going to run, I’d do 400m and 800m repeats, because they’re short and make me want to kill myself. Even if I did them regularly, I wouldn’t call myself a 400/800m sprinter. Identifying myself as those things to others seems misleading. 

You’re absolutely free to disagree with that assessment and I personally am not going to try to assuage you beyond explaining my point of view. 

Secondly, there are things you learned from having done that meet. If you are saying that you didn’t learn anything about making weight, selecting attempts, commands, rules of the fed, how to train the week of the meet, or any number of obstacles re: meets and meet preparation etc. then you’re either not paying attention or your meet experience was closely handled by someone else. 

I am definitely not putting competition on a pedestal. It’s a fucking shitshow, a waste of money and time, and has only made me feel worse about myself as a person. 

But let’s be honest, if you’re gonna go to a meet, do you want someone who’s never been to a meet to help handle your lifting or do you want someone who’s done at least one meet? Even as a regular competitor, there are details and rules that I don’t 100% remember about meet day. I feel more comfortable with the guy who’s done 3-5 meets for 5+ years than I do with the guy who has only done 2-3 in his lifetime. I would not invite the guy who’s never done a meet.

You’re probably addressed the wrong person with a lot of that argument.

Meets are important, yes. Did I know the rules, commands and how to “make weight” before I decided on a meet? Yes. I read the rule book, I was interested so I investigated.

I don’t have a coach or a handler. I teach myself. I choose my own attempts based on what I think I can do. I also didn’t need a meet to tell me what I should aim for.

Besides all of this, there are so many sets of rules, if we are going to competing makes a title, which fed do we use? Which judges? I’ve competed twice and been to one other meet and watched dozens, and I’m yet to see consistency in judging. Not to the point where you could say any competitive lifter could get white lights in any fed on any given day.

I’m not saying anyone who touches a weight is automatically a powerlifter or bodybuilder or wizard. If you’re mainly training for a specific discipline, I don’t feel anyone can argue with you calling yourself as such. I realise you’re not going to agree and that’s fine, everyone is entitled to their opinion. For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.

For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.”

People on tumblr calling themselves powerlifters isn’t going to get the sport noticed, and if it does people will subsequently dismiss the sport even more since they will think it is a bunch of social media addicts who post gym selfies. 

The sport grows when more people participate. CrossFit is getting a lot of folks into it through competition and greater participation and a positive, competitive community. 

If you want the sport to improve you don’t focus on the internet community and what they think they should be called, you focus on exposure to a wider audience and get more people to do meets. 

Cross fit. LOL.

> says powerlifting shouldn’t be elitist

> acts elitist about a community which brings more bodies and more money into a dead end sport

mmm

"Dead end sport." Ask the elite level cross fitters how they train. It ain’t cross fit, brother.

Correct. That doesn’t change the fact that as a community, CrossFit exposes more people to powerlifting than tumblr or embracing people who won’t compete and thus won’t contribute to the growth of powerlifting. 


Link

Jan 13, 2014
@ 6:21 pm
Permalink
34 notes

Offering a civil place of discussion »

zombearsquatter:

frontraisesforever:

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

zombearsquatter:

In all the drama going on, I’d like to offer an oasis. I have competed in a push/pull meet and am prepping for my first full meet on March 1. I am, technically, a competitive powerlifter. There is a difference between competitive and recreational powerlifting/bodybuilding/Olympic weightlifting….

I don’t think it’s divisive to the community to use correct terminology. Non-competitors aren’t oppressed, they’re just not called competitors. In fact, non-competitors are often welcomed and ENCOURAGED to enter contests to further themselves and their lifting.

If it’s about the sport, it doesn’t grow unless people actively participate in it, “respect” for the sport improves when non-competitors participate and understand it more intimately than they would by logging their workouts on fitocracy or something. 

There shouldn’t be any negative connotations between being called something or not (and if we’re going to be real I personally attach a negative connotation to BEING a powerlifter) to me it’s just calling a spade a spade. 

Competitors are called “competitors”.

I knew just as much about an arched bench and squatting to parallel before I competed.

People who don’t know these things don’t not know them because they haven’t competed. They don’t know them because they haven’t made use of the internet.

If I hadn’t already, all this talk would turn me off competing or wanting to be a powerlifter. It just looks like people are jerks. In reality, that’s not the case. By telling people they’re not a powerlifter or bodybuilder or whatever else, you are excluding them.

Competing doesn’t grant you a badge and all the knowledge of universe.

People who don’t know shit shouldn’t try to teach others, agreed. People can know shit without having competed.

If you feel excluded because there are some people in a certain community who don’t want to address you with a certain term until you’ve participated in an integral activity to that community, that is you either attaching too much significance to the term or too much importance to how others define you. I’m not saying people “shouldn’t” call themselves powerlifters unless they’ve participated in a meet, I’m just saying it’s factually wrong.

If I started going to an mma gym a few times a week for fun but never intended on signing up for a fight, I wouldn’t call myself an mma fighter. If I were going to run, I’d do 400m and 800m repeats, because they’re short and make me want to kill myself. Even if I did them regularly, I wouldn’t call myself a 400/800m sprinter. Identifying myself as those things to others seems misleading. 

You’re absolutely free to disagree with that assessment and I personally am not going to try to assuage you beyond explaining my point of view. 

Secondly, there are things you learned from having done that meet. If you are saying that you didn’t learn anything about making weight, selecting attempts, commands, rules of the fed, how to train the week of the meet, or any number of obstacles re: meets and meet preparation etc. then you’re either not paying attention or your meet experience was closely handled by someone else. 

I am definitely not putting competition on a pedestal. It’s a fucking shitshow, a waste of money and time, and has only made me feel worse about myself as a person. 

But let’s be honest, if you’re gonna go to a meet, do you want someone who’s never been to a meet to help handle your lifting or do you want someone who’s done at least one meet? Even as a regular competitor, there are details and rules that I don’t 100% remember about meet day. I feel more comfortable with the guy who’s done 3-5 meets for 5+ years than I do with the guy who has only done 2-3 in his lifetime. I would not invite the guy who’s never done a meet.

You’re probably addressed the wrong person with a lot of that argument.

Meets are important, yes. Did I know the rules, commands and how to “make weight” before I decided on a meet? Yes. I read the rule book, I was interested so I investigated.

I don’t have a coach or a handler. I teach myself. I choose my own attempts based on what I think I can do. I also didn’t need a meet to tell me what I should aim for.

Besides all of this, there are so many sets of rules, if we are going to competing makes a title, which fed do we use? Which judges? I’ve competed twice and been to one other meet and watched dozens, and I’m yet to see consistency in judging. Not to the point where you could say any competitive lifter could get white lights in any fed on any given day.

I’m not saying anyone who touches a weight is automatically a powerlifter or bodybuilder or wizard. If you’re mainly training for a specific discipline, I don’t feel anyone can argue with you calling yourself as such. I realise you’re not going to agree and that’s fine, everyone is entitled to their opinion. For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.

For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.”

People on tumblr calling themselves powerlifters isn’t going to get the sport noticed, and if it does people will subsequently dismiss the sport even more since they will think it is a bunch of social media addicts who post gym selfies. 

The sport grows when more people participate. CrossFit is getting a lot of folks into it through competition and greater participation and a positive, competitive community. 

If you want the sport to improve you don’t focus on the internet community and what they think they should be called, you focus on exposure to a wider audience and get more people to do meets. 

Cross fit. LOL.

> says powerlifting shouldn’t be elitist

> acts elitist about a community which brings more bodies and more money into a dead end sport

mmm


Link

Jan 13, 2014
@ 5:40 pm
Permalink
34 notes

Offering a civil place of discussion »

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

zombearsquatter:

In all the drama going on, I’d like to offer an oasis. I have competed in a push/pull meet and am prepping for my first full meet on March 1. I am, technically, a competitive powerlifter. There is a difference between competitive and recreational powerlifting/bodybuilding/Olympic weightlifting….

I don’t think it’s divisive to the community to use correct terminology. Non-competitors aren’t oppressed, they’re just not called competitors. In fact, non-competitors are often welcomed and ENCOURAGED to enter contests to further themselves and their lifting.

If it’s about the sport, it doesn’t grow unless people actively participate in it, “respect” for the sport improves when non-competitors participate and understand it more intimately than they would by logging their workouts on fitocracy or something. 

There shouldn’t be any negative connotations between being called something or not (and if we’re going to be real I personally attach a negative connotation to BEING a powerlifter) to me it’s just calling a spade a spade. 

Competitors are called “competitors”.

I knew just as much about an arched bench and squatting to parallel before I competed.

People who don’t know these things don’t not know them because they haven’t competed. They don’t know them because they haven’t made use of the internet.

If I hadn’t already, all this talk would turn me off competing or wanting to be a powerlifter. It just looks like people are jerks. In reality, that’s not the case. By telling people they’re not a powerlifter or bodybuilder or whatever else, you are excluding them.

Competing doesn’t grant you a badge and all the knowledge of universe.

People who don’t know shit shouldn’t try to teach others, agreed. People can know shit without having competed.

If you feel excluded because there are some people in a certain community who don’t want to address you with a certain term until you’ve participated in an integral activity to that community, that is you either attaching too much significance to the term or too much importance to how others define you. I’m not saying people “shouldn’t” call themselves powerlifters unless they’ve participated in a meet, I’m just saying it’s factually wrong.

If I started going to an mma gym a few times a week for fun but never intended on signing up for a fight, I wouldn’t call myself an mma fighter. If I were going to run, I’d do 400m and 800m repeats, because they’re short and make me want to kill myself. Even if I did them regularly, I wouldn’t call myself a 400/800m sprinter. Identifying myself as those things to others seems misleading. 

You’re absolutely free to disagree with that assessment and I personally am not going to try to assuage you beyond explaining my point of view. 

Secondly, there are things you learned from having done that meet. If you are saying that you didn’t learn anything about making weight, selecting attempts, commands, rules of the fed, how to train the week of the meet, or any number of obstacles re: meets and meet preparation etc. then you’re either not paying attention or your meet experience was closely handled by someone else. 

I am definitely not putting competition on a pedestal. It’s a fucking shitshow, a waste of money and time, and has only made me feel worse about myself as a person. 

But let’s be honest, if you’re gonna go to a meet, do you want someone who’s never been to a meet to help handle your lifting or do you want someone who’s done at least one meet? Even as a regular competitor, there are details and rules that I don’t 100% remember about meet day. I feel more comfortable with the guy who’s done 3-5 meets for 5+ years than I do with the guy who has only done 2-3 in his lifetime. I would not invite the guy who’s never done a meet.

You’re probably addressed the wrong person with a lot of that argument.

Meets are important, yes. Did I know the rules, commands and how to “make weight” before I decided on a meet? Yes. I read the rule book, I was interested so I investigated.

I don’t have a coach or a handler. I teach myself. I choose my own attempts based on what I think I can do. I also didn’t need a meet to tell me what I should aim for.

Besides all of this, there are so many sets of rules, if we are going to competing makes a title, which fed do we use? Which judges? I’ve competed twice and been to one other meet and watched dozens, and I’m yet to see consistency in judging. Not to the point where you could say any competitive lifter could get white lights in any fed on any given day.

I’m not saying anyone who touches a weight is automatically a powerlifter or bodybuilder or wizard. If you’re mainly training for a specific discipline, I don’t feel anyone can argue with you calling yourself as such. I realise you’re not going to agree and that’s fine, everyone is entitled to their opinion. For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.

For a “sport” that is trying so hard to get noticed, I don’t think this is the right way to do it.”

People on tumblr calling themselves powerlifters isn’t going to get the sport noticed, and if it does people will subsequently dismiss the sport even more since they will think it is a bunch of social media addicts who post gym selfies. 

The sport grows when more people participate. CrossFit is getting a lot of folks into it through competition and greater participation and a positive, competitive community. 

If you want the sport to improve you don’t focus on the internet community and what they think they should be called, you focus on exposure to a wider audience and get more people to do meets. 


Text

Jan 13, 2014
@ 5:20 pm
Permalink
7 notes

iron-inside:

Brent Kim’s level of self-loathing is admirable. Srs.

HE SOUNDS LIKE A REAL FAGGOT


Link

Jan 13, 2014
@ 5:06 pm
Permalink
34 notes

Offering a civil place of discussion »

kelskicksass:

frontraisesforever:

zombearsquatter:

In all the drama going on, I’d like to offer an oasis. I have competed in a push/pull meet and am prepping for my first full meet on March 1. I am, technically, a competitive powerlifter. There is a difference between competitive and recreational powerlifting/bodybuilding/Olympic weightlifting….

I don’t think it’s divisive to the community to use correct terminology. Non-competitors aren’t oppressed, they’re just not called competitors. In fact, non-competitors are often welcomed and ENCOURAGED to enter contests to further themselves and their lifting.

If it’s about the sport, it doesn’t grow unless people actively participate in it, “respect” for the sport improves when non-competitors participate and understand it more intimately than they would by logging their workouts on fitocracy or something. 

There shouldn’t be any negative connotations between being called something or not (and if we’re going to be real I personally attach a negative connotation to BEING a powerlifter) to me it’s just calling a spade a spade. 

Competitors are called “competitors”.

I knew just as much about an arched bench and squatting to parallel before I competed.

People who don’t know these things don’t not know them because they haven’t competed. They don’t know them because they haven’t made use of the internet.

If I hadn’t already, all this talk would turn me off competing or wanting to be a powerlifter. It just looks like people are jerks. In reality, that’s not the case. By telling people they’re not a powerlifter or bodybuilder or whatever else, you are excluding them.

Competing doesn’t grant you a badge and all the knowledge of universe.

People who don’t know shit shouldn’t try to teach others, agreed. People can know shit without having competed.

If you feel excluded because there are some people in a certain community who don’t want to address you with a certain term until you’ve participated in an integral activity to that community, that is you either attaching too much significance to the term or too much importance to how others define you. I’m not saying people “shouldn’t” call themselves powerlifters unless they’ve participated in a meet, I’m just saying it’s factually wrong.

If I started going to an mma gym a few times a week for fun but never intended on signing up for a fight, I wouldn’t call myself an mma fighter. If I were going to run, I’d do 400m and 800m repeats, because they’re short and make me want to kill myself. Even if I did them regularly, I wouldn’t call myself a 400/800m sprinter. Identifying myself as those things to others seems misleading. 

You’re absolutely free to disagree with that assessment and I personally am not going to try to assuage you beyond explaining my point of view. 

Secondly, there are things you learned from having done that meet. If you are saying that you didn’t learn anything about making weight, selecting attempts, commands, rules of the fed, how to train the week of the meet, or any number of obstacles re: meets and meet preparation etc. then you’re either not paying attention or your meet experience was closely handled by someone else. 

I am definitely not putting competition on a pedestal. It’s a fucking shitshow, a waste of money and time, and has only made me feel worse about myself as a person. 

But let’s be honest, if you’re gonna go to a meet, do you want someone who’s never been to a meet to help handle your lifting or do you want someone who’s done at least one meet? Even as a regular competitor, there are details and rules that I don’t 100% remember about meet day. I feel more comfortable with the guy who’s done 3-5 meets for 5+ years than I do with the guy who has only done 2-3 in his lifetime. I would not invite the guy who’s never done a meet.


Link

Jan 13, 2014
@ 4:18 pm
Permalink
34 notes

Offering a civil place of discussion »

zombearsquatter:

In all the drama going on, I’d like to offer an oasis. I have competed in a push/pull meet and am prepping for my first full meet on March 1. I am, technically, a competitive powerlifter. There is a difference between competitive and recreational powerlifting/bodybuilding/Olympic weightlifting….

I don’t think it’s divisive to the community to use correct terminology. Non-competitors aren’t oppressed, they’re just not called competitors. In fact, non-competitors are often welcomed and ENCOURAGED to enter contests to further themselves and their lifting.

If it’s about the sport, it doesn’t grow unless people actively participate in it, “respect” for the sport improves when non-competitors participate and understand it more intimately than they would by logging their workouts on fitocracy or something. 

There shouldn’t be any negative connotations between being called something or not (and if we’re going to be real I personally attach a negative connotation to BEING a powerlifter) to me it’s just calling a spade a spade. 


Text

Jan 13, 2014
@ 4:07 pm
Permalink
16 notes

Patrick needs to check his privilege

I’ll check it for him.

We’re talking about his dick right

(via deadliftsandbeer-deactivated201)